Declining, not falling. Part 1.

Two weeks from now, for the first time in sixty years, there will be no teachers in my family. I will be just another private individual, removed from the in-some-ways very public role of teacher. Apart from a GAP year, this will also be the first time that my life has not depended directly on education. Or it would be, if you discount my wife’s university-paid income that will hopefully keep us alive while I figure out what to do next.

Education is in the news again at the moment, it being union conference season – but greater distance lends a different perspective. My plan is to record some of my thoughts at this unexpected point, assuming the still-faulty brain will permit.

My book remains unpublished. I have been repeatedly told that it is well thought-out and well-written – but the people who would want to read it (i.e. practising teachers) don’t have the time, and those who do are not interested in what I have to say. I think it was summed up by one reviewer, who on the strength of only the proposal decided (wrongly) that it would be nothing more than a personal polemic, lacking in references to accepted research and government policy.

So that says it all: those who actually do education are too snowed under actually to think about it, while those who make the decisions are not interested in what a classroom teacher has to say.

I am not ruling out teaching again, but it won’t be in the immediate future. I’m still feeling very hurt by what has happened. More likely, I will find some non-classroom role, as I’ve seen that the job I have been doing has progressively eroded my health and wellbeing to a point that is no longer acceptable. But I have other directions I want to explore first.

I suppose I am looking for some kind of closure on the last three decades – though it is unlikely really to happen, as I will probably never know for sure what the actual agenda was for pushing/neglecting a committed and long-serving teacher to the point of breakdown, and then ‘losing’ them, on the basis of a couple of disputed exam targets.

Normally, I would have jumped at the opportunity for five months’ ‘sabbatical’ – who wouldn’t? But I would not recommend my experience to anyone; I also now realise that the clouds of that storm had been brewing for considerably longer than I thought. But in the interim, my life has been transformed. I suppose every cloud has its lining…. I now have time to appreciate everyday life, to nurture relations with people around me, to value the simple but fundamental pleasures of life that hitherto were squeezed to almost non-existence by the ever-present weight of Teaching. I never lived to work, but I had failed to appreciate the extent to which my work had come utterly to dominate my life.

I’ve not turned against education; I was brought up to value it, and I believe it to be a cornerstone of a civilised society. It continues to enrich my own life in very many ways, and I still believe it is one of the greatest gifts that any society can offer its members. In troubled times, it is more important than ever.

But I have become increasingly disenchanted with what formalised education has become, in Britain at least. It is no longer doing that which I described above. It has utterly lost sight of its fundamental purpose, its methods and intentions hijacked by uncomprehending vested interests. I had a simple, even naive wish when I entered the profession: to cultivate and broaden the minds of up-coming generations and in particular to share my appreciation of those fields that interested me. The educational system has increasingly diverted, even prevented me from doing that, in ways and to extents that I have largely lost interest in being part of it.

A society that has lost the understanding to educate it people, as well as house and feed them, provide for their health and allow them to have a stake in its destiny is one that is heading down the pan. As I wrote nearly a year ago, recent national events have only fuelled that perception.

But the current education scene is, I believe more part of the problem than the solution. In the next post or two I will discuss why.  This seems widely known: I have not had a single person from a wide range of backgrounds and political persuasions tell me that I am making a big mistake in leaving, and I don’t think they are just being kind. They know teaching as presently configured is a fool’s (or a saint’s) job; I’m neither.

But perhaps the biggest indictment is that is it now extensively harming the basic welfare of those who go through it, whether as teachers or pupils. I don’t only mean mental health, though that is perhaps the sharp end of it.

And of that, I want no part.

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7 thoughts on “Declining, not falling. Part 1.

  1. Can’t think of this as good news, but I’m glad that, in some sense, you’ve escaped. There is a less crazy world out there.
    As to the bigger picture, for all my current school is better than many, the system feels like it is building towards something. Maybe it’s the “Wo ist Steiner” phase (I think I nicked that idea from @emc2andallthat), or the bit in a heist story when it becomes clear that the facade in front of the scam is becoming impossible to maintain.

    • Thanks R.I. I am already starting to find that less crazy world… I agree, the system does feel as though it is building towards something, though Heaven knows what… which is why the post title *should* have read ‘Declining, IF not falling’. Facades and scams are not too strong to describe the current situation, which is why I (think I) want no more of it. Just another part of the coming Dark Ages, I fear.

      Best wishes
      T.P.

  2. I am sorry to read what you have gone through. I feel your pain re: why are teachers who have worked so hard so disposable for no good reason.

    When I left full-time teaching two years ago I felt that I was missing out on life and for what? I was particularly concerned that I was at the mercy of parents and children in a way that I felt that was unacceptable, with the focus always on being some perfect teacher which I know is impossible for any human being to be.

    In some ways I am in a similar position to yourself in terms of deciding what the future will hold. If you need to chat at any point do DM me on twitter. You are also welcome to visit if you feel like spending a day in the Midlands.

    Keep taking care of yourself.

    • Thanks Teachwell, I appreciate your concern. Not sure if you remember me from Andrew’ curries – we have met briefly. I may well be in touch at some point – I need to go back to Leicester (did my degree there in the ’80s, and some family roots are there).

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