A Critical Thinking approach to Brexit – Part 2

I am sharing this here not for political purposes but to highlight the withdrawal of A Level Critical Thinking, no longer taught as it could not be reconciled with the new, narrower validation criteria. Had it been more widely taught, the skills it developed would have been serving the nation well in these troubled times. Part 1 can be found at the same place.

SPREZZATURA

After the long discussion in part 1, this is somewhat shorter…

If it is accepted that public debate on the specifics of matters like Brexit is inevitably limited to unprovable matters of belief, one is left with the question of how should it be debated.

Rather than resorting to claim and counter-claim, it would have been much better to establish a set of key principles against which to evaluate competing options. While this partially happened at political level, the difficulty is transferring it to the public arena, and an audience that inevitably has neither the knowledge to evaluate what is being suggested nor (probably) much patience with arcane technicalities.

The proof of this was the failure of Remain to capture public support. And their opposition did not help either its own case or the debate as a whole by being repeatedly unable to convey either a focused, specific definition of…

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